how to buy cbd oil in california

The 2018 Farm Bill officially removed CBD from the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) definition of cannabis. Prior to this decision, the DEA classified marijuana as a Schedule I substance. While this decision changed the legality of CBD on the federal level, it was left for the state to decide how to legislate CBD law in their jurisdictions.

As always, we highly recommend doing research on the CBD products you want to purchase before doing so. Since CBD is still not approved by the FDA, there is a chance of products being sold that are not all they claim to be, and not all CBD is the same. It’s important to look for companies that source their hemp from U.S. farms and are transparent with their ingredients. Be aware and research the companies that are thinking of purchasing from before implementing the use of their products into your routine.

Is CBD Legal in California in 2021?

As we previously stated, you can find CBD in many stores across California, but you can also always purchase CBD products online, which allows you time to browse and do you research for where you want to buy from. Always purchase from brands you can trust that are transparent with where their hemp products come from.

Research regarding Cannabidiol suggests that CBD may have properties that are ideal for those who wish to address issues with inflammation, anxiety, and depression.

What Restrictions Are There for Buying CBD in California?

A88’s CBD is sourced from Centuria Foods, a global leader in phytocannabinoid-rich hemp-derived CBD ingredients for use in nutritional, pharmaceutical and wellness products. Our CBD is sourced from , hemp grown in the U.S and all A88CBD products contain less than .3% CBD.

How to buy cbd oil in california

Once that information is received, samples will be collected by the commissioner or an approved third-party for testing. All labs must have an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) / International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 17025 accreditation and use a validated method for total THC analysis. Any industrial hemp crop that doesn’t meet testing requirements will be destroyed.

Hemp production and sale, including its cannabinoids and CBD specifically, remain tightly regulated federally. The Farm Bill provides that individual states may also regulate and even prohibit CBD cultivation and commerce. States may attempt to regulate CBD in food, beverage, dietary supplements, and cosmetic products independently of the FDA’s rules.

California makes cannabis legal to possess and buy for adults 21 and older, and cannabidiol (CBD) oil products are widely available at dispensaries and over-the-counter at other retailers. However, state law prohibits CBD oil derived from hemp from being added to foods and drinks until the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) determines it is safe.

Hemp growers must also submit samples for THC concentration testing no more than 30 days before harvest. Registrants must submit their registration number, name and contact information, anticipated harvest date, name of the seed cultivar(s), physical address, Global Positioning System coordinates, general description of the location, and acreage of the crop, and the name and contact information of the laboratory to conduct the testing for THC content.

California CBD possession limits

Hemp strains don’t produce enough of the cannabinoid THC to cause intoxication, but all types of cannabis, including hemp, were considered illegal under the 1970 Federal Controlled Substances Act. The legislation swept all cannabis under the Schedule 1 umbrella, which defined cannabis as a substance with a high potential for abuse, no accepted medical use, and a likelihood for addiction.

After the 2018 Farm Bill passed, the state introduced AB 228, which would have clarified CBD legality and legalized hemp-derived CBD to be included in food, beverage, and cosmetics products without restrictions, but the bill was held. Until the bill is passed and signed by the governor, California’s laws surrounding hemp-derived CBD and CBD oil remain consistent with the FDA.

The California Industrial Hemp Farming Act, which authorized the commercial production of industrial hemp, went into effect in early 2017. The act, SB 566, authorizes the commercial production of industrial hemp in California and became effective on Jan. 1, 2017. The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) is developing a program to administer the new law.

Licensing requirements for CBD

The FDA has historically been strict when it comes to health claims or content that could be understood as medical advice — and makes no exception for CBD.

CBD oil usually comes with a dropper to allow consumers and patients to measure out their dose. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps