full or broad spectrum cbd oil

THC does have added benefits but we would like our customers to have the option of having no THC. If THC is something you are looking for in your CBD, there are options available to you at local stores.

In order to verify a company has terpenes in their extracts one must ask for a third-party lab test which a lab that is fully licensed by the state and is unbiased, unrelated to the company in anyway. Look for the terpene profile content and if it shows “ND,” meaning non-detectable, then it does not contain it at all or contains nothing close to what it needs to be for the added therapeutic benefits terpenes brings.

We have the option to have CBD products containing the legal limit of THC. There is nothing wrong with this, however we don’t feel comfortable misusing the term “less than 0.3% THC” because the majority of individuals who use CBD do not want to consume THC.

Understanding the difference between Full Spectrum and Broad-Spectrum Extracts is quite simple. The difference among them is the level of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that is in the extracted CBD. Although there isn’t a huge difference, the main difference is that Full Spectrum contains 0.3% THC while Broad Spectrum contains non-detectable levels of THC also known as “THC Free” CBD oil.

What is THC-Free in Broad Spectrum?

Something to note about Full Spectrum and Broad Spectrum, is that they should contain a “spectrum” of minor cannabinoids, and more importantly terpenes. Although many CBD companies emphasize how their products contain terpenes because it’s “Full Spectrum” or “Broad Spectrum,” it is actually not always true. Click this link to read about what terpenes are and their benefits.

THC-Free simply means a product or extract that contains non-detectable levels of THC. There is a difference between non-detectable and zero THC or 0% THC because it’s impossible in a botanical extract; hence, the accurate term being THC-Free.

Some other reasons that we push for THC-Free only products:

Full Spectrum Extract CBD Oil

It’s your choice if you want to choose a Full Spectrum or Broad Spectrum CBD product because they are both great at doing its job, however, make sure you purchase from a reputable company because the marginal difference of hemp extracts is huge. From the plant it starts from, the extraction method, to the purification method it can make a huge difference at any stage of the process.

Full or broad spectrum cbd oil

Choosing the correct starting material for product development is a careful balance of values. For most commercial purposes, purer extracts are desirable because they allow producers to standardize and iterate based on known, reliable effects. However, for the more wellness-focused, the benefits of a fuller complement of phytochemicals are worth the variability.

The graphic above illustrates the difference in color and plant materials in each of the three extracts.

The interactions between various cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids are complex; it will take decades of research to parse them. Fortunately, terpenes and flavonoids have at least as much scientific research behind them as ahead of them. They are already common additives in many commercial processed goods, especially cosmetics, and of course, food – plants make tens of thousands of different terpenes alone. They can also be synthesized.

Both Full and Broad Spectrum concentrates offer the benefits of the Entourage Effect. If your CBD product is relatively low-dose, having a diversity of phytochemicals is even more important. Beyond their potential therapeutic effects, all these minor players also give cannabis its depth, creating a symphony of flavor and smell, and ultimately making the bitterness of cannabinoid extracts more palatable.

Isolate

The ECS is a network of neurotransmitters, their receptors and enzymes. It is present in all extant vertebrate species and some insects. Scientists’ discovery of the ECS has happened gradually over the latter part of the last century, beginning in 1964 with the identification and synthesis of THC by Mechoulam and Gaoni, pioneering Israeli scientists. It was named by Italian biochemist Vincenzo Di Marzo, who initially outlined its influence in “eating, sleeping, relaxing, forgetting and protecting” in the early 90s. This system plays a critical role in almost every regulatory function of our bodies.

The Entourage Effect is the reasoning behind extractions that seek to retain as much of the native phytochemical context as possible. However, this comes at the expense of standardization and palatability, so each use case will necessitate its own balance of values.

Solvent: In this method, a solvent is added to dissolve the cannabinoids, then evaporated, leaving a concentrated oil. Solvents can be further divided by polarity. Non-polar solvents, such as butane, dissolve only non-polar compounds from the plant, in this case the oils and other lipids making up the trichome heads. Polar solvents, such as ethanol, will extract both non-polar and polar compounds, including water-soluble compounds such as chlorophyll. These bring with them with strong herbaceous flavors; however, many polar compounds are desirable from a therapeutic standpoint.

Full Spectrum vs. Broad Spectrum vs. Isolate CBD

The following are the terms used to categorize the three different types of extracts.

Cannabinoids are produced most abundantly in trichomes, the resin glands of the hemp and cannabis plants. To be used in processed beverages or topicals, these glands must first be concentrated, then their oils separated from plant waxes and other non-useful vegetative matter. There are two main categories of processes to do this: solvent and non-solvent. Various levels of technological sophistication exist within each category, and most finished extracts employ elements of both.