cbd to treat ptsd

Cbd to treat ptsd

The overarching objective of the proposed project is to test the clinical efficacy of CBD in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder using a rigorous double-blind randomized clinical trial methodology. Participants (n=150) meeting full DSM-5 criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) will be randomized to one of 3 treatment arms: (a) CBD -Isolate; (b) CBD-Broad Spectrum; (c) Placebo oil.

STUDY METHODS AND PROCEDURES

Over the past two decades, trauma-focused psychotherapies for PTSD have been shown to outperform more traditional supportive psychotherapy or pharmacotherapy and have become the first line treatment for PTSD. Despite these advances, trauma focused treatments such as prolonged exposure therapy (PE) are associated with high rates of treatment refusal, and among those who do enter treatment, approximately 25% drop-out. These data highlight the need to develop PTSD treatment strategies that are both effective and more palatable to patients.

Informed consent was obtained for each patient at their intake appointment. Appointments every 4 weeks included clinical evaluation and documentation of patients’ PTSD symptomatology through PCL-5 questionnaires. Concurrent psychiatric medications were held constant or changed according to routine clinical practice, whereas CBD was often intentionally used as a method of decreasing or avoiding the use of psychiatric medications. CBD was added to care, dropped from care, or refused as per individual patient and practitioner preference. The Western Institutional Review Board approved a retrospective analysis of the charts of patients with a diagnosis of PTSD who received CBD as part of their treatment program.

Patients were instructed to take CBD once or twice per day based on severity of symptoms. The median starting oral capsular dose was 25 mg per day (range: 25–100). The median dose of liquid CBD given throughout the study was 9 mg per day (range: 1–16). The mean total starting dose of CBD (liquid or capsular or both) was 33.18 mg (standard deviation [SD] = 23.34). The mean total dose of CBD prescribed at the 8-week follow-up appointment at the conclusion of the study period was 48.64 mg (range: 2–100). The dose of CBD was adjusted at each 4-week appointment based on the patient’s presentation and experience. Most patients received an increase in the dose of CBD because treatment was provided to maximize PTSD symptom reduction, which seemed to be directly correlated with dose. These doses are much lower than the doses used in the previous clinical literature for multiple reasons. The first is that lower doses appear to elicit an adequate clinical response in our experience. Second, the current retail cost of CBD would make the use of 600 mg per day cost-prohibitive. Finally, doses for the liquid spray route of administration are typically lower than that of capsules and are usually measured as single milligrams of CBD per spray, thus rendering higher doses impractical for patients relying on liquid CBD.

Current evidence regarding the use of CBD for PTSD in humans is minimal. One case report showed that administration of 12–37 mg of oral CBD daily was associated with a reduction in anxiety symptoms and sleep disturbances in a 10-year-old patient with PTSD due to sexual trauma. 16 Another study showed that 32 mg of inhaled CBD resulted in consolidation of aversive memory extinction and attenuation of explicit fearful responding in healthy human subjects. 17 See Bittencourt and Takahashi 18 for a recent comprehensive review of pre-clinical and clinical studies regarding the relationship of CBD to PTSD. To date, no clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of CBD in reducing symptoms of PTSD in humans has been completed.

2 Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO.

Setting

1 Rocky Vista University, Osteopathic Medical Student IV, Parker, CO.

The hypothesis of this study was that patients with DSM-5-diagnosed PTSD who were administered CBD along with routine psychiatric care would show a decrease in PTSD-specific symptomatology. This hypothesis was based on prior rodent and limited human studies that suggest that (1) CBD may cause decreased response to and increased extinction of aversive memories, and that (2) CBD may have an anxiolytic effect, which, in turn, would have therapeutic value in patients with PTSD. To this end, we conducted a retrospective file review of adult patients with PTSD who were treated with CBD as part of standard psychiatric care in an outpatient clinic. The goal of this review was to examine the tolerability of CBD and its effectiveness in PTSD symptom reduction.

This article describes a retrospective chart review of adult psychiatric patients with a diagnosis of PTSD who consented to treatment with CBD as augmentation to routine psychiatric treatment at an outpatient psychiatric clinic. All current patients with a diagnosis of PTSD were considered for treatment with CBD between February 2016 and May 2018. Patients were not excluded based on the presence of other psychiatric comorbidities (aside from an active thought disorder) or concurrent use of cannabis. The diagnosis of PTSD was established through clinical evaluation by a mental health professional (psychiatrist, psychiatric nurse practitioner, or physician assistant). Inclusion criteria for the present analysis required a cut-off score of 33 on the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for the DSM-5 (PCL-5) 19 and a minimum of two consecutive follow-up appointments after the initial intake appointment. The final sample consisted of 11 adult patients with a diagnosis of PTSD and who met inclusion criteria.

Sample

After the initial baseline assessment, PCL-5 assessments were completed by patients every 4 weeks to monitor changes in the severity of PTSD symptoms. In addition to CBD, patients also received routine treatment in the form of psychiatric medications, various psychotherapy modalities, and standard integrative treatments, as indicated for their diagnoses of PTSD and other psychiatric comorbidities. These integrative treatments often included dietary changes, herbal supplementation, neurofeedback, and intravenous infusions of vitamins and minerals.

Conclusions: Administration of oral CBD in addition to routine psychiatric care was associated with PTSD symptom reduction in adults with PTSD. CBD also appeared to offer relief in a subset of patients who reported frequent nightmares as a symptom of their PTSD. Additional clinical investigation, including double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, would be necessary to further substantiate the response to CBD that was observed in this study.