cbd oil walgreens

Cbd oil walgreens

Read our article on the Side Effects of CBD to learn more.

As the CBD market continues to grow, there is a greater need than ever to ensure that the public knows the potential risks of taking CBD, as well as the benefits. Although much has been written about the numerous health benefits of taking CBD, there is far less information available about the possible harms.

CVS is stocking CBD in just 800 of its 9800 stores. You might be able to find over the counter CBD if you live in one of the following states:

In a press release regarding its decision to start stocking over the counter CBD, a spokesperson from Walgreens said:

Over the Counter CBD in the UK

Despite over the counter CBD being something of a gray area in the US, it is far more widely available in the UK. Major pharmacy chain Boots (which is, incidentally, owned by Walgreens) and leading health-food store Holland and Barrett are now both stocking several CBD products. Unlike their American counterparts, these stores are also carrying oral CBD, including oils, capsules, and lozenges.

You can buy CBD over the counter in Walgreens if you live in:

Over the past few years, the CBD market has exploded. A recent report conducted by the Brightfield Group estimates that the industry will be worth an incredible 23 billion dollars by 2023. Not bad for a substance that was, until recently, largely unheard of. Over the past few decades, research into CBD has revealed that it possesses a wealth of potential benefits.

Is CBD Over the Counter Safe?

As more and more CBD companies are emerging, it is no surprise that major drug stores such as Walgreens and CVS have decided to get onboard. However, these stores are playing it safe as far as their product lines go. They will only be stocking topical CBD products, for the time being at least.

A large proportion of Americans believe that CBD should be available without a prescription. While almost 40% of the general population are in favor, this figure rose to 61% for people who were familiar with CBD and its uses.

Cbd oil walgreens

Walgreens will sell CBD products in 1,500 stores in select states. (Photo: Charles Krupa, AP)

Cannabis-based products got a major boost in December when President Donald Trump signed off on an $867 billion Farm Bill that gave a green light for hemp to be cultivated on a large scale.

“This product offering is in line with our efforts to provide a wider range of accessible health and wellbeing products and services to best meet the needs and preferences of our customers,” Walgreens spokesman Brian Faith said in a statement to USA TODAY.

The drugstore chain will sell the cannabis-based products in Oregon, Colorado, New Mexico, Kentucky, Tennessee, Vermont, South Carolina, Illinois and Indiana, Faith said.

Walgreens declined to specify which brands it would carry, CNBC reported.

CNBC was the first to report the news Wednesday, which came about a week after CVS announced some of its stores will sell CBD topical products.

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Unlike marijuana, another cannabis species, hemp has almost none of the psychoactive compounds that cause a user to get high. Now that it’s no longer labeled a controlled substance, more businesses have the opportunity to create hemp-based products, from tinctures to lotions.

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Let’s be clear here: this is a big step and a major development for the cannabis industry. The fact that nationally recognized brands are putting their weight behind cannabis-tangential products is almost certainly a harbinger of things to come – even if the complex reality of FDA regulations forces the drugstore chains to limit their CBD product lines to topical applications for practical and legal reasons.

Product on display (Leef Organics) at the ECO Cannabis Oakland Grand Opening Media Event at ECO . [+] Cannabis on March 28, 2019 in Oakland, California. Photo: imageSPACE for ECO Cannabis/MediaPunch /IPX

This means that before we see these chains really double down on the new cannabis landscape, a new regulatory framework will have to be developed and implemented, providing guidance for what they can – and, importantly, what they can’t – do. We may still be a long way off from that framework coming into place, but as with other developments, it is encouraging to see a willingness to explore and take action where possible.

So how do companies respond to market demands while also not getting themselves crosswise with federal regulators?

While this application has been approved for a very specific and limited use, further research and clinical trials may lead to approval for other drugs and for other uses. In the 2018 Farm Bill, Congress removed hemp from the drug schedules outlined in the Controlled Substances Act, legalizing it under federal law. But even though this made CBD derived from hemp legal, it was still subject to FDA regulations when used in applications under the FDA’s purview. What this means, most notably, is that selling CBD as a food additive or dietary supplement gets tricky.

Many people, though, have found CBD to be helpful in providing relief for a wide range of symptoms, including chronic pain, anxiety, inflammation, gut disorders, and neurological conditions. And last January, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Epidiolex, a CBD oral solution, as a treatment for seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy.

We saw one solution recently, as the two biggest pharmacy chains in the United States decided that CBD was worth exploring. Both CVS and Walgreens announced – within days of each other – that they would begin selling hemp-derived CBD products in 2,300 stores between the two nationwide chains. While you won’t find the trendy CBD products listed above at these drugstores, their shelves will soon contain a variety of topical applications like creams, lotions, salves, patches, and sprays.

That’s a lot of hype for a compound that is one of more than a hundred cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant, and for one that causes absolutely no psychoactive effects. After all, for decades, psychoactive effects have been what many cannabis users have sought, leading to strains that had been specifically bred to diminish the amount of naturally occurring CBD.

Cannabidiol, or CBD, seems to be everywhere these days. Trendy lunch spots are drizzling CBD oil on salads, bartenders and mixologists are adding it to cocktails, juice bars are adding it to their smoothies alongside wheatgrass and ginger, and coffee shops are adding it to their lattes. Even Bon Appetit is adding it to their arsenal of ingredients, promoting recipes like CBD Caramel Sauce, which they suggest serving “over ice cream, stirred into yogurt, or drizzled over a brownie or slice of pound cake.”