cbd oil laws in michigan

Cbd oil laws in michigan

Trusted brands upload their products’ laboratory test results on their website as proof of their potency and purity. You’ll see its cannabinoid levels as well and know if the product is really as advertised.

What Type of CBD is Right for You?

Smoking marijuana is legal for both medical and recreational marijuana users in Michigan.

What are the Types of Marijuana Allowed in Michigan?

Reading the reviews and feedback left by real customers gives you a good idea about CBD oil and its manufacturer. Through these, you’ll know the expected results of the product and its side effects (if any).

Under this legislation, CBD oil and other products derived from hemp would not fall under Michigan Medical Marijuana regulations.

According to the Michigan Legislature’s website, the bill was approved by the governor on Dec. 28 and filed with the Secretary of State on the same day.

“CBD oil derived from hemp doesn’t get you high,” Johnson said in a statement.

Cbd oil laws in michigan

Unlike certain other departments, such as the Department of Natural Resources’ Conservation Officers, there is no “LARA police” to enforce the CBD ban. While LARA does have inspectors and examiners, as well as an enforcement division, this division is focused on investigating complaints on licensees and licensed establishments. LARA’s power in this way is limited. Similar to the Bureau of Medical Marijuana Regulation, there is a Liquor Control Commission within LARA that regulates the sale of alcohol. One of LARA’s primary enforcement tool for enforcing liquor laws is the revocation, suspension or of that person’s liquor license. However, the Liquor Control Commission relies on other law enforcement activities to prevent or control the sale of alcohol by unlicensed individuals. In other words, for activities that fall outside this focus, LARA requires the help and assistance of state or local law enforcement.

The bottom line is that if you are a medical marijuana business licensee under LARA, LARA could use its power over licenses and licensees to enforce its CBD ban against you or your company. But this also means that if you do not hold any licenses regulated by LARA, there is currently not much LARA can do at this point.

That begs the question—how is LARA going to enforce its interpretation of the state’s Medical Marijuana laws, especially when some CBD products are legal and other almost identical products are not?

Second, he is concerned with the unregulated nature of the CBD market and thinks state government should have the power to step in to protect consumers. He mentioned these concerns recently at the Cannacon conference in Detroit, and he may have a point.

Confused yet? Here is what he was really saying: CBD derived from cannabis sativa is regulated the same as Marijuana. What he didn’t mention, and what you needed to read between the lines to catch, is that under this definition, CBD derived from the mature stalks or sterilized seeds is legal in Michigan and not subject to the state’s Marijuana laws . This position is in line with the DEA’s position on CBD extracts.

The first question asked to Mr. Brisbo was essentially “what gives you the right to do this without any legislation?” His response was that CBD is a derivative of the cannabis sativa plant, and that CBD would now be included in this definition, even if produced from a hemp plant with little to no THC. He said that the federal definition of Marijuana, which finds that cannabis sativa with less than 0.3% THC is not considered regulated Marijuana, is only incorporated into the Michigan’s hemp laws but not its marijuana laws. For its marijuana laws, there is no “THC qualifier”, so in Michigan, any derivative of the cannabis sativa plant other than from sterilized seeds, oil from seeds, and mature stalks is considered a controlled substance.

The final reason? To help MMFLA licensees! While the reaction from the Michigan Cannabis industry to the CBD ban was visceral, I actually see it at as Mr. Brisbo throwing Michigan MMJ companies a bone. Essentially, the ultimate effect of the ban will be to prevent stores and individuals not licensed under the MMFLA or MMMA from selling CBD. This means that, absent caregivers, dispensaries would be the only place to buy legal weed AND legal CBD. With the market for CBD growing in popularity seemingly by the month, this guidance could have a big effect on licensees down the road—for better or for worse.