cbd for prostate cancer

Cbd for prostate cancer

In vitro studies with THC have shown that cannabinoids affect migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis (programmed cell death) of cancer cells, but each type of cancer appears to respond differently to the effect of exogenous cannabinoids. Many types of cancer cells have a higher concentration of CB1 and CB2 receptors.

Medicinal cannabis must be distinguished from recreational cannabis which is used to achieve a psychotomimetic state of ‘high’. Cannabis strains used for recreational purposes contain a higher THC and lower CBD ratio than cannabis for medicinal use. Usually two cannabis plants are used: cannabis sativa which has a higher THC concentration and cannabis indica which has a higher CBD concentrate. The flavonoids are known for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. The terpenoids are resins (oil) with a strong odour.

It is also important that we inform the patient about the possible interactions of cannabis oil with certain regular medications such as Coumarin (this blood thinner interacts with cannabis oil, leading to an increase of the INR and a greater risk of bleeding!). There are different types of cannabis oil available, such as CBD and THC oils with different concentrations which makes it difficult for patients to make a choice.

On the Internet, patients can get a lot of information about the curative effect of cannabis oil on prostate cancer but this information extrapolate the results of pre-clinical work to possible effects in people without any factual evidence. I often see patients in the doctor’s office showing me a website where it has been proven that cannabis oil can cure prostate cancer, which is obviously their own interpretation. In my view this can be a misleading message even though the website does not explicitly provide false information. The website [See figure below] shows information which is based on a study published in the British Journal of Cancer. This is correct, but the website “neglects” to mention that this is a publication of an in vitro study. The patient might not even know what an in vitro study is and is not aware that there are no studies on humans yet to prove this.

Use of cannabis in cancer

Human beings produce their own cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) according to need and are not stored in the body. Like endorphins, the human body produces endocannabinoids in response to activities such as physical exercise (the high of runners might be due to endocannabinoids, not endorphins!).

– Pre-clinical studies (in vitro = cells in laboratory and in vivo = in mouse model) have shown the antiproliferative, anti-metastatic, anti-angiogenic and pro-apoptotic effects of cannabinoids in various malignancies (lung, glioma, thyroid, lymphoma, skin, pancreas, endometrium, breast and prostate). Even if an identified substance in vitro / in vivo appears to have a beneficial effect on a disease, it is important to realise that only one in 5,000-500,000 substances obtain a registration and becomes available to the patient (after 10-16 years of different study phases). Cannabis has never been clinically studied as a treatment for malignancy.

Cbd for prostate cancer

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Clinicians have been challenged to improve the treatment of biochemically recurrent (BCR) prostate cancer in which prostatic specific antigen (PSA) rises without radiological or clinical progression years after localized treatment (radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy) with or without hormonal treatment. Approximately 50-90% of men with high-risk prostate cancer will experience a BCR. Based on the abovementioned preclinical observations of CBD’s effect on prostate cancer and its safety data in two non-cancer populations, a phase I study of CBD in men with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer will be conducted.

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Cannabinoids (CBD) have been widely used in medicines for centuries to control pain, nausea or vomiting, and to stimulate appetite, especially in cancer patients. Both cannabinoids receptor 1(CB1) and cannabinoids receptor 2 (CB2) were highly expressed in cultured prostate cancer cells compared to normal prostate cell lines. CBD inhibits tumor growth in xenograft model.

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine