cbd and osteoarthritis

Cbd and osteoarthritis

CBD is not addictive and has minimal known side effects. Extracted from cannabis satvia, CBD belongs to a family of plants that have long been used for their medicinal properties. According to Roger Clemens DrPH, professor of pharmaceutical sciences and Associate Director of the Regulatory Science Program at the University of Southern California School of Pharmacy, more research is needed to prove the efficacy of CBD as a treatment for arthritis. However, he says: “Studies among humans indicate CBD, when administered by injection or in topical transdermal forms, may have antiarthritic effects independent of cannabinoid receptors. In addition to helping to control inflammation, cannabinoids reduce pain by activating central and peripheral CB1, peripheral CB2 receptors, and CBD-sensitive non-cannabinoid receptor targets.”

The symptoms experienced with OA encompass inflammatory, nociceptive, and neuropathic pain. CBD is an exogenous (out of the body) cannabinoid that acts on our endogenous (in the body) cannabinoid system to function in an antioxidant capacity, decrease inflammation and act as an analgesic.

Historically, osteoarthritis has been thought of as a non-inflammatory arthritis, however, recent evidence showcases the role of inflammation in the symptoms of OA, as well as in the condition’s progression. Intervention with CBD may offer an opportunity to slow the progression of OA by decreasing inflammation, both systematically and locally. The interaction of CBD with your immune system and its potential antioxidant affect may help to decrease symptoms associated with OA and improve quality of life.

Can CBD help relieve symptoms of osteoarthritis?

The legality of CBD in the United States has caused some confusion regarding CBD’s relation to marijuana. Let’s break it down:

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis, affecting more than twenty million Americans. OA is a degenerative joint disease, defined by loss of joint smoothness and range of motion due to increased bone density and bone growths (osteophytes). OA is further defined by:

What is CBD?

CBD, the non-psychotropic cannabinol of marijuana, is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option and may offer unique benefits for osteoarthritis. It has been shown to attenuate symptoms of pain and inflammation. Considering CBD for osteoarthritis pain? We asked the experts for their advice to help you make an informed decision.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a compound that is found in the cannabis plant. Unlike THC, which is another compound from the same plant, CBD is not psychotropic, and therefore does not create the “high” that the plant is more typically known for.

Cbd and osteoarthritis

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There’s a good chance you’ve tried it already: according to a Gallup poll in August of 2019, about 14% of Americans report using CBD products, and the number one reason is pain. The Arthritis Foundation conducted its own poll and found that 29% reported current use of CBD (mostly in liquid or topical form), and nearly 80% of respondents were either using it, had used it in the past, or were considering it. Of those using it, most reported improvement in physical function, sleep, and well-being; of note, a minority reported improvement in pain or stiffness.

Dos:

But now, there is.

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There is one definite downside: cost. Prices range widely but CBD products aren’t inexpensive, and depending on dose, frequency, and formulation, the cost can be considerable — I found one brand that was $120/month, and health insurance does not usually cover it.

If you have chronic arthritis pain, you may be wondering about cannabidiol (CBD) as a treatment. CBD, along with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other chemicals, is found in marijuana. But unlike THC, CBD is not “psychoactive” — that is, it does not cause the intoxication or high associated with marijuana use.

Of course, there is anecdotal evidence and testimonials galore, including reports of dramatic improvement by people who tried CBD in its various forms (including capsule, liquid, topical, and spray) for their pain. But we are still waiting for well-designed, scientifically valid, and rigorous clinical trials (such as this one in progress) that are so badly needed to answer the question of just how helpful CBD may be to people with chronic arthritis pain.

A word about arthritis pain

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While there are laboratory studies suggesting CBD might be a promising approach, and animal studies showing anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving effects, well-designed studies demonstrating compelling evidence that CBD is safe and effective for chronic arthritis pain in humans do not exist. A randomized trial of topical CBD for osteoarthritis of the knee has been published, but in abstract form only (meaning it’s a preliminary report that summarizes the trial and has not been thoroughly vetted yet); the trial lasted only 12 weeks, and results were mixed at best. One of the largest reviews examined the health effects of cannabis and CBD, and concluded that there is “substantial evidence that cannabis is an effective treatment for chronic pain in adults.” But there was no specific conclusion regarding CBD, presumably because definitive studies were not available.